How to become intelligent

My limited research to date has led me to the conclusion that learning to talk is hard to do unless there is some level of intelligence behind the learner. That’s where the chatterbots fall short. They exhibit a superficial ability to talk to you, but there’s nothing behind the curtain. They respond credibly only if you stick to the kind of discussion anticipated by their creators. Any deviation produces nonsense that is obvious to the human but not to the machine.

So, teaching a machine to understand normal English is going to require some kind of intelligence. Like many of the ideas I’ve been exploring, this is a well-worn intellectual path. Most of the material on the Internet that I can actually understand is from research done in the 1970s and 1980s. Some researchers concluded that coding up a program with all of the grammer rules of a language will not allow the program to capture the meaning of even a simple sentence. Most of what we say requires some kind of “world knowledge” beforeyou can make sense of it. You figure out what a sentence means by parsing the meaning as much as you parse the grammer, or maybe by doing both together. Some of the buzzwords I’ve come across in this regard are conceptual dependency, procedural semantics, and conceptual analysis. All have to do with knowledge representation and I won’t take the space here to define them as Google does a fine job of covering the topic. SHRDLU (and here) was a program written in 1972 that seemed to capture much of what I’d like to do, albeit in a very small domain. I can’t quite figure out why it was never extended.

I think I’m going to start with a simple program that’s based on these ideas about using world knowledge as as a means of understanding language. A lot of what I’ll try first is described in online course materials from GA Tech and Cardiff Univ among others. The first decisions are going to be how to represent world knowledge, what should the machine “know” to begin with (all of WordNet, for example?), and how will the machine learn new things.

I also look over my shoulder every now and then wondering when Sarah Connor is going to show up to prevent the birth of Skynet. Is this a thing that should be done?

About Rob

I'm an engineer, co-host of the mintCast, a long-time computer hobbyist, a solidly mediocre guitar strummer, a sometimes player of chess and Dungeons & Dragons Online, and a Jesus-follower.
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2 Responses to How to become intelligent

  1. Clinton Balmain says:

    I don’t think you need to worry about Sarah Connor. If she were coming for you, you’d already be dead.

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